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So, TotalSciFi apparently thinks they have a list of the most important women in sci-fi TV and movies.

I'm sure Ellen Ripley is very cool, and in what little bits I've seen of her I've been impressed, but... really? Number one "most important woman of sci-fi?" And... they must be joking, putting Rose Tyler at #7, above the likes of... well, everyone else on the list? Look, I know I'm biased by, y'know, not being overly fond of the Rose/Ten relationship, but... seriously? Number seven of the most important women in sci-fi? o_O

Particularly not since, through some bizarre lack of intelligence on behalf of whoever wrote this list Susan Ivanova is all the way down at #18. And no Zoe Washburn anywhere? I am gravely insulted by this.

Also, listing it as "the 25 women who shook sci-fi"... implies that they might have done something different or changed the genre somehow. Which I don't particularly think a lot of these did. At all.

Here - have the list.

But you know what I find the most upsetting out of this whole thing?

17) MIKAELA BANES (Megan Fox, Transformers)

I sure as hell hope that's someone who didn't make it into the movie. Please? Please, someone tell me it wasn't Shia LeBouef's girlfriend? Please? Because if it was, and she made it in as somehow, bizarrely, cooler than Ivanova, I may just weep for the future of the genre.

So, folks - who is the list missing? Who do you think definitely has to be on there? And who's your pick for #1 most ground-breaking or earth-shaking female character in sci-fi?

Cross-posted to my own journal - apologies to people on both!
Current Mood:
amused amused
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 Hi there,
Um, I'm  new to this community and to the  net in general; I hope I'm posting to the right place - please let me know if I'm not - but just wanted to recommend the novels of Jane Gardam to anyone who might not be familiar with her work. Check out Crusoe's Daughter, A Long Way From Verona and Bilgewater - Gardam has a unique, funny, and empathetic perspective which renders these far above the average tale of adolescent experience and growing up.
Current Location:
Aberdeen
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P.J. Harvey, White Chalk
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If this isn't allowed, please feel free to remind me and I'll fix it. *grin* I was just wondering...

I wanted to ask people who have read Laurell K. Hamilton, how many continue to read her through her series, particularly her Anita Blake series? I ask, because it seems that there are great many individuals who stop reading her at some point. In fact, most people I have talked to(in both in RL and on the 'net) stop reading her works when they feel that the plot becomes more "porn than plot."

Like I said, just a random question. But since she is one of the more visible authors with a fairly well-known female protagonist(two if you count her protagonist Merry) I thought it might be interesting to hear from people here.

Oh, and yes, this was prompted by your post rivendellrose *grin*
Current Mood:
curious curious
Current Music:
When You Say Love Me - Josh Groban
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Drive-by posting while at work -

A very well-written Salon.com article on "Xena."

Thoughts? Reactions? I ran across another article (umm... somewhere) on the progression of female characters on TV, and would you believe that not a single sf/f character made it to the list? Laura Petrie, Mary and Rhoda, Murphy Brown, and then Carrie Bradshaw. Interesting how mainstream media just doesn't want to admit to sf/f characters, even when (IMHO) they often provide the best examples of feminist thought.

But, since this is an open forum for all female characters, what do you all think are the most significant female characters on TV?

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Just thought that I would drop another quick note recommending a very fun, well written, and interesting series:

The first in the series is titled, Moon Called, and is an introduction into the world of Mercedes Thompson. She is a young woman living in the Tri-cities(Washington State), a mechanic who also happens to be a shape-changer.

Taking place in present day America, the book is one of those where fantasy(ie vampires, fae, werewolves) lives side by side with the mundane world, and the author has a very deft hand at placing fantasy in the real world without it being, "over the top." In addition, while the fantasy is obviously an important aspect of the story, it is written in such a way, that many who would normally not read the genre, may find the book enjoyable.

As the first book in a newly established series, it does not necessarily have a terribly complicated plot-line, but is very good at what it does have, namely, character introduction. The author is quite adept at writing well-rounded characters. Mercedes is more than your carbon copy supernatural heroine, and her friends and neighbors all have more than just a name and a "power." In addition, Mercy's world is very well defined and rich; a nice blend of the real and the imagined. (And hey, what can I say, I also like that it takes place in my home area of the world, namely the Northwest. *grin*)

Well, in short, I recommend this book highly, and I for one, am looking forward to the release of the nest one in February.

Oh, and here's the author's site for more info:

http://www.hurog.com/

Edit: I know that this edit is very late, but, just thought I'd add that Blood Bound came out some little bit ago. It fully delivers on the promise of the first novel. Particularly nice, is the fact the author doesn't just have Mercy as a sterotyped female character and the plot does indeed thicken, as the saying goes. Anyhoo...
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awake awake
Current Music:
Everything - Lifehouse
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Some of you might be interested to know that Karen Ellis' webcomic Planet Karen has a syndicated lj feed at planet_karen.
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Hasn't Charmed become the longest-running show with female leads?

I remember it being good in the beginning, but sadly I found that it became somewhat predictable and lacklustre, suffering from "freak of the week" syndrome in later series.

But then, the trends have to start with the writers... I write a lot of fiction and my characters are balanced between male and female, but considering that it's just so much more interesting to see women breaking conventions set by their male counterparts, why aren't there more women around in big-budget films and series?

Current Mood:
curious curious
Current Music:
Time is Running Out - Muse
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Ragnell (aka morchades) now has a syndicated lj feed for her insightful comics blog Written World in which she discusses comics from her feminist perspective and frequently spotlights female characters.
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Here's something I thought was right up our collective alley - apparently Geena Davis (currently playing the American president on some ABC show I'm only aware of through a hideously large bulletin board behind our neighborhood Rite Aid) has started a new organization to address "the lack of female characters in television, movies and other media, particularly for young children." Their website, SeeJane.org includes the following findings:

- There are three male characters for every female.

- Fewer than one out of three (28 percent) of the speaking characters (real and animated) are female.

- Less than one in five (17 percent) of the characters in crowd scenes are female.

- More than four out of five (83 percent) of films’ narrators are male.


It's an interesting thought, and once I started working over the movies (especially kids movies) I've seen recently, I realized that most of them fit the trend exactly. It's the kind of thing that hardly gets noticed in our culture, I think, because we're so used to it, but I like the point that this really messes with the opportunities for kids to have female role models (or even just female images) to deal with.
Current Mood:
thoughtful thoughtful
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Here's an interesting little bit that I thought you all might appreciate (with apologies to those who've seen it multiple times in the past few days):

Someone's created a handy little example of the male version of how certain artists have been portraying female comic book characters on covers.

ETA: Forgot to note - those pics aren't entirely worksafe! Covered, but... well... pretty focused.

Off-topic though the pictures are, sigelphoenix pointed out that the subject itself is a fair jumping-point into a discussion of female characters in comic books/graphic novels in general. Personally, I'm juuuust starting my education in that medium, so I'd love to hear what all of you think about the characters, the portrayals... just generally what you think of the women in the graphic medium. I'll start it out by saying that I'm fascinated by the idea of the women in the X-Men 'verse, and totally intrigued by what I've heard about Mina Harker in League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

Any thoughts?
Current Mood:
curious curious
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